A Safety-Conscious Canine

A little story I wrote for a blog I contributed to. The blog is no longer running so I decided to republish it here. Enjoy.

Prim has consistently been rather stubborn about going to church. When I asked my trainer about it, she suggested that perhaps Prim simply wasn’t religious. I laughed at that, but it wasn’t a sufficient explanation, especially when I realized that Prim was somewhat unwilling to walk the route from church, as well as to church. Today I figured out why. 

Our walk to church includes traversing several sets of steps, the top level of a parking garage, and a long, side-walkless driveway, one that is consistently populated by church-goers’ vehicles leaving and entering our parking lot. Because there is no sidewalk, we are forced to stick as close as we can to the edge of the road. Prim is trained to do this. It’s a technique called “shore-lining”, but she is still not satisfied. She often stops in the parking lot or veers to the grass when she sees an idoling car, as I think she recognizes it as a threat. Well, one day on our way out of church, Prim decided to take matters into her own paws. Despite my direction to walk straight, across the parking lot and along the driveway, Prim insisted upon turning left. Curious, I trusted her and followed.

“Let’s go home.” 

I said, hopefully, even though I didn’t actually know whether we could get back to our appartment this way. She led me along a brief strip of parkinglot, then pulled me strongly to the right to step onto a sidewalk. I couldn’t help but laugh. We stuck to the sidewalk, made a right, then walked another good distance, until Prim pulled right again and I recognized the slant of our leasing office parking lot beneath my feet, and a minute later reached out to feel the gate that would take us into our complex. 

We had never walked that route before, but somehow Prim knew we could get home that way, and knew it was safer with side walks. She won’t let us walk any other way now. I love my safety conscious canine.

Reflections After a Month in Ireland — Our Newest Adventure, Part 4

This is a continuation in a series about my transition after moving to Ireland. You can find the first post

here.

Monday October 1, 2018 

I can’t believe I’ve been here a whole month already. It’s still a process of getting to know names, getting to know people beyond just a hey I met you once level, forming deeper friendships, but I’m really starting to feel comfortable here and like I have a community. It’s kind of crazy really, how quickly one can start feeling at home in a new place. I still have a fair amount to learn about the physical area itself, and occasionally get lost, but nothing compares to that first week of wandering without any idea where I was going. At this stage, I have a very good grip on the routes I take most frequently, and am gradually adding more to my mental map as I get time to explore further.

God is providing in every situation, saying something considering I completely ignored him last week. I was sick, and did a tiny bit of scripture reading and prayer time, but mostly spent my week distracted by Facebook. I felt very convicted last night at our communion service at church. It’s hard, I guess because of my pride for me to admit that I am going to continue to not desire him the way I want to, but he is gracious, and he is faithful. He will sanctify me, as long and arduous as the process may be. 

I am also trying to find a balance between work and play. Last week I had a lot of fun — played a session with a friend, attended a birthday dinner, took a few long walks, went to both church services and a party for one of the children in our congregation… you get the idea… but I have a few assignment deadlines approaching so will have to buckle down. Part of this is because I was so tired the first few weeks of being here, I did not have the energy to socialize, so feel like I’m playing catch-up a little bit in the realm of community building. That’s a problem for an extravert. Piece by piece, though, things are falling into place, and I’m thankful to be here.